How Leaders Should Negotiate?

Nearly everything, we do, involves a certain degree of negotiating. We negotiate, at home, at work, and during all our activities. However, perhaps, never is negotiating skill, experience, expertise, and ability, more necessary and needed, than, in being a quality leader. With that in mind, this article will attempt to briefly examine, consider, discuss, and explain, how and why, it’s so important, for a true leader, to negotiate, and why, it is a leader, who determines, whether negotiations are successful, or less satisfying.

1. Learn the skills and necessities: The first thing, one must understand and clearly, know, is successful negotiations, are not about, merely, winning, but, rather, the best results arise from a win – win, mindset, process and approach. While lying/ distorting, making over – stated claims/demands, might get immediate gratification, in the longer – term, results will suffer, unless/ until, both sides depart from the process, believing they have achieved, what they needed, to do, for the interests of their organization, etc. Begin by learning to effectively listen, and learn, what the other side, is needing, and stating, and gain knowledge, and expertise, from every conversation and experience. Do extensive homework, and seek, to create a meeting of the minds, by identifying mutual, cost – saving areas, concept, and plans, and realizing, when you create a new benefit, for the other side, there’s more, they might be able to offer you.

2. Examples: If you are negotiating, for example, with a venue for an event, which includes food, discuss ways to reduce the venue’s costs/ expenses, and ask for them to share those savings, with you. Think outside – the – box, and determine, how communicating, with integrity, from the onset, and clearly, explaining, what you need, and your limitations, and you will improve your results.

3. Don’t lie!: You need a meeting – of – the – minds, which requires mutual trust. Doing so, requires significant efforts, and time, to create, but, one lapse, will usually destroy your efforts.

4. Clarify and organize, using a Request for Proposal (RFP): Make yourself clear, from the beginning, by beginning the process, with a Request for Proposal, or, RFP, and make it, as thorough and complete, as possible! Pit one venue, against another, and select the one, which meets your needs, and budget. Know your budget, from the onset, so you might properly plan, and negotiate. The responses to the RFP, should be included, as part of the final contract.

Negotiate, like a leader, and do so, from strength, expertise, experience, and maintain absolute integrity. Are you ready to lead effectively?

Negotiation Tip of the Week: “How To Listen Better To Win More Negotiations”

To win more negotiations, listen better. When you negotiate, how well do you listen? The better you listen, the more negotiations you’ll win.

… but he didn’t answer the question! Good negotiators are very adept at diverting questions that don’t serve their purpose. In some cases, they’ll give superficial responses that appear to answer the question, or like a good magician, draw your attention in another direction without you noticing that they’ve done so.

To enhance the probability of winning more negotiations, listen to how questions are answered, and listen to the words used to represent the answers. In so doing, you’ll gain invaluable insight into hidden meanings and the thought process behind those meanings.

Listen to how questions are answered:

Take note to what degree a question is answered, avoided, and/or modified. As an example, if you ask, “Is that your best offer?” You might receive several responses:

  • In the past, that’s as much as we’ve paid.
  • Due to our current ‘situation’, we have a ceiling on the amount we can pay.
  • Other vendors/suppliers are accepting our price structure.

In each of the above answers, you received a response to your question but what you did not receive was a direct answer to your question. Depending on your alertness or how diligent you wanted to appear, you might rephrase the question, point out that you’d not received an answer to it, or accept the answer given in order to address the situation from another perspective. The course of action you adopt should be aligned with how you wished to position yourself and the person with whom you’re negotiating to enhance your negotiation position.

Listen to the words used to answer questions:

Words are the representation of the thoughts being conveyed. In the above answers, the word choice conveyed additional insight per how that person was thinking. In response ‘A’, the information conveyed is stating, “That’s our norm.” It could also be perceived as, you shouldn’t consider going outside of the norm. Conform to our standards.

In response ‘B’, the subliminal message is, “We’re in a challenging time, please bear with us. Help us by being understanding.” If you acquiesce, you might attempt to acquire chits that can be used in future negotiations. If you do so, attempt to instill in the current negotiation when and how you might use such chits. Keep in mind, you’ll also be setting a precedent to ‘help them’ again in the future, since you did so this time.

Depending on the value of your offer, you could position it so that it’s seen as ‘added value’ that warrants a ‘higher investment’ on the part of the purchaser, or one that you can fit into the current pricing structure because of the reason that’s best suited for the situation and your purpose. The point is, after you’ve gleaned the additional information based on how your questions are answered, you have a better understanding of how to position yourself.

You make decisions based on your interpretation of the situations you’re in. Then, based on your interpretation, you decide how you’ll act and react to situations. Thus, you and only you control your actions in a negotiation. So, to control more of the aspects of the negotiation, listen to the meanings and hidden meanings in the answers given by the other negotiator. Your reward will be in winning more negotiations… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating.

Tricky Questions Answered Thanks to Presentation Training

Great presentations can see you winning more clients and securing additional business, which explains why many workers feel under pressure on these occasions.

In order to get prepared for important talks there are many training courses that can give hints and tips regarding your performance. The majority of advice concentrates on suggesting ways in which you can ensure that presentations run smoothly via effective preparation. Gathering all the necessary materials, including backups, should digital devices fail, is imperative.

In addition, you can pick up suggestions on how to communicate the information held on files to your audience, such as displaying open body language and maintaining eye contact. A part of presentations that may not be quite so easy to control are question and answer sessions. Here the floor is turned over to listeners, many of who may find their voice to ask difficult or controversial inquires.

Despite there being no script to follow in this instance, there are still ways of dealing with potentially awkward moments, so your presentation does not suffer. Although tricky questions may be quite difficult to cope with, you may also feel unnerved when you open the floor and are greeted with silence. This can be the result of people not wishing to speak up, or perhaps the majority of queries were answered during your talk.

If you are keen to get your audience involved, you may like to try asking open questions about the listeners’ views on the topics you have raised. In addition, mentioning inquiries that you have encountered from previous presentations may encourage people to respond during your current talk. Another technique is to ask for a show of hands on specific topics, as this is likely to generate some cohesion and possible conversation among the group concerned.

At times you may encounter audience members who have many queries that they wish to be answered, which means they risk dominating the question and answer session. This can stifle others listening to your talk and may leave them feeling unsure about unanswered aspects of some subject matter. To move on from here, you could verbally recognise the person’s enthusiasm then ask others in the room their views on the questioner’s additional queries, making it clear that is beneficial that everyone gets a chance to speak.

If you wish to plan ahead for this kind of situation, it may help to make sure a fellow colleague is sitting in the audience who is prepped to comment on a persistent questioner’s views in order to move the discussion along. Getting prepared to deal with awkward questions, or those that aim to threaten the integrity or running of your talk is an important part of effective presentation training. These kinds of queries are dreaded by many, but learning the best way to react in these circumstances ensures you can confidently resolve difficulties.

After receiving a negative or confrontation inquiry, be sure to maintain open body language, while verbally recognising the questioner’s feelings concerning the issue. Following this, a common tactic is to ask the audience as a whole if they feel the same way. This can help to balance discussions and get views aired that are positive in tone. Answering questions of a negative bent that highlight potential or real problems gives you the chance to reassure listeners and boost faith in your project or organisation. This can be achieved by addressing the facts of the situation and the clear objectives that need to be taken to resolve discontent.