Presentations – 3 Tips From Multi-Media To Help You Win Audiences

What words come to mind when you think “multi-media”?

Quick, ever-changing, colorful, active, visuals, sounds, the unexpected…connection and interaction.

Your audiences live with–have embraced–multi-media in their daily lives. They gravitate to more color, more action, more variety, more stimulation. Why can’t presentations be more like multi-media?

They can if you allow yourself to use multi-media as a model for your presentations. Here are 3 tips to do that.

1) Reduce the desire to explain everything. Your favorite app doesn’t explain itself. It works and you learn how to use it by just using it. When you’re introducing a new idea or product or service in a presentation, just start. The typical jargon-laced introductions and the old and boring “tell’ em what you’re gonna tell’ em” rule is out the window these days. Jump right in with a colorful story or example, or a challenge, or a hard question. Your audiences are ready for this.

2) Mix up the visuals in your slide deck. Corporate rules about design parameters are counter-productive to the goal of getting connected with the audience. A fixed three-color scheme, slide templates where everything is exactly the same on every slide, perfect photos or stylized graphics–none of these attract the audience. The human brain’s efficient filing system says to itself -”I’ve seen this before, know what it means..NEXT!” so instead of increasing awareness of the brand, these corporate looks decrease interest.

3) Add sound and movement to your presentation deliberately and thoughtfully. Sounds can be embedded in your slides–show a process or flow and embed a sound that suggests movement. This can be fairly subtle–no roaring plane engines–but your audience will pick it up and their attention will be stronger than otherwise.

Incorporate movement by asking the audience to raise their hands, to write something on a handout, or to handle and use a promotional product or gift. Something small makes a big difference in the course of a 30-60-90 minute presentation.

Multi-media doesn’t sit still and doesn’t lecture. It moves and it grabs and it makes you participate. Do the same with your presentations and your audiences will be eager for more.

Past, Present or Future?

Which one are you more inclined to live in?

We all will have one that we are best at living in, and one we are not so good at living in.

Time was once described to me as “endless moments of now”. And that is true because as soon as we try to think about ‘this’ moment… no ‘this’ moment… no ‘this’ moment… it is gone. It’s in the past and that moment in the future you are looking forward to – well it just became now, and as now became the past you can see time really is a wonderful thing!

When I coach people, one of the codes I am listening for is their relationship to time. Are they living in the past? Living in the present? Or living for their future?

None are correct or incorrect, and my belief is we need to experience all three, but the danger comes when we tend to live in one or the other for too long.

For instance – people that spend too much time in the past. The advantage and disadvantage of living in the past, is that are you get to re-experience an event over and over and over again. Now if that experience is a powerful, emotional, exciting time, that fills you will confidence, strength, love and happiness – rock on, live there for a bit and then use those lessons and that emotion to bring into the present to create a compelling future.

The only thing is…

Most people don’t replay over and over and over the events in their past that made them smile. The replay the fears, the sadness, the failures, and they take that doubt, that fear and that sadness into the present, and believe that is what the future holds.

If living in the past is dictating your future, it’s time to get out.

You should be using your past for lessons and as reference points of success – that’s it.

For people that aren’t as good as living in the past, you need to make sure you are still remembering your successes. So for me – I have become an expert in putting the past away. What has happened has happened, and I never think about the past. This means if an event has been very upsetting or something bad has happened, I find it very easy to get over it – give me 48 hours and it’s all good. But that also means when I achieve big goals and have huge success, give me 48 hours and I have moved on and can barely remember it.

So yes – it is very useful to not waste energy on what has upset you in the past, but you need to still remember your success. To do this I have a success page where every month I need to write down all my successes and good memories on the past I want to remember. I also write down the lessons I need to remember that I learned from the bad. But the actual bad memories I make very small and fuzzy and let them go – I don’t need them

Then we have the people that live in the present. This is an awesome place to be. The advantage and disadvantage of living here is it is only about now. You are focused on what you are doing, nothing else matters, you are completely experiencing everything in the moment and fully immersing yourself in it, rather than letting your mind drift and thinking about the past or the future and not enjoying the present moment of now. A lot of us need to learn how to be more present when we are riding – only thinking about riding, not what to cook for dinner, or the work proposal, time with our friends, family and loved ones – we want to fully engage with the horse or your instructor rather than having our mind split thinking about something else. Staying present and in the moment is the best gift you can give someone… and yourself.

The dangers of only living here though, is you never plan or look toward the future. If you only think about the present you could be ruining your future. i.e. – if in the present I want a chocolate cake and I only think about the present and keep eating chocolate cake… in the future I will be regretting my past of chocolate cake. I see this with people who don’t like to look in the future, they hate goal setting as in the past they have been disappointed by their future. So they refuse to think about it, and only control what they believe they can control – which is the present.

And for everyone who lives in the future! Hi!! That’s where I live! And that’s because the future is shiny and new and exciting, and we are constantly working on how to make it better and more exciting and more wonderful – we forget to take time out and just enjoy the present, enjoy the moment that was the future which has become now, and is now in the past.

So wherever you are in your life right now, enjoy it! Enjoy the present as the quote goes – “Yesterday is History, Tomorrow is a Mystery and Today is a gift: that’s why we call it – The Present.” — Unknown Author

Use the past – it has plenty to teach you, but don’t live there, what’s done is done and it cant be undone. Use the future plan what you want, and set goals so your future can be as compelling and as rich and as exciting as you can make it, and enjoy each and every passing moment of now. In balance of all three you will have the peace, love and excitement you want.

To Your Past, Present & Future Success!

Fast Or Slow: What’s The Right Speed For Your Next Negotiation?

We often spend time talking about the negotiation styles or negotiating techniques that should be used in our next negotiation; however, we rarely ever spend any time talking about how fast the negotiations should go. Should you next negotiation be a fast negotiation or a slow negotiation?

Why Quick Deals Are Never A Good Idea

I really like the idea of a “quick deal”. You know what I mean: you get in, you get out and you have a deal that you can live with without having to invest too much time or effort planning. However, I speak from experience when I tell you that a quick deal is almost never a good idea.

Quick deals generally wrap up with one or both sides leaving the table feeling unhappy. The reasons can be varied, but generally it comes down to the simple fact that they now realize that they somehow missed a critical detail. If only they had had more time to explore more possibilities, then they could have reached a much better deal.

Racing through a negotiation does not allow you to take care of the people side of a deal. Everyone’s ego needs to be stroked during a negotiation; they need to feel as though you are willing to take the time to understand them as a person before they are going to be willing to reach a deal with you. If you skip this step, you might get a deal, but you’re not going to get the best deal.

Why You’ll Want To Control The Pace Of Your Next Negotiation

The pace of a negotiation is something that can be controlled. Now the big question is by who? It’s either going to be you or the other side of the table. I’d like to recommend that it should be you.

The first thing that you are going to want to do when a negotiation starts is to determine how fast the other side wants the negotiations to move. Are they operating under a time limit and do they need to reach a deal quickly? Or is something not ready on their side and they need to slow things down so that they can get their act together?

As a negotiator you need to determine what pace they want to negotiate at and then you need to try to change it. Move from slow to fast, or fast to slow. See how the other side reacts. This will reveal information to you about what kind of constraints they are operating under and will provide you with more information that you can then use to create your negotiating strategy.

What All Of This Means For You

The final outcome of your next principled negotiation may depend on the pace of the negotiation. The other side of the table may want things to go fast or slow, but that doesn’t mean that you should agree with them.

Negotiations that complete too quickly can leave one or both parties feeling dissatisfied. Because all of the possibilities were not explored, one or both parties may feel that they didn’t get the best deal. Additionally, when the other side wants the negotiation to move at a given pace, you need to take control and make the negotiations move at the pace that you desire.

Who controls how fast a negotiation progresses is one form of negotiating power. You’ll want to control this and so you need to take the time to determine how fast the other side wants the negotiation to proceed and then take steps to control its pace.